Street Portraits

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The face, unaware of itself.
That was the inspiration of this street portraits project, Humans are Wildlife Too!
As a photographer seeking to document the human condition in it’s diverse environments, I was drawn to the essential humanity of the face itself.  Portraiture usually assumes a few classic styles of subject framing, ie: the tight headshot, the upper torso frame or the story-telling contextual environmental portrait.  For this project, I was drawn to the essential component of portraiture, the face.
Plain or beautiful, each is unique and has something to tell us, to impart to us. About them.  About ourselves.

The challenge, was to find those faces in the wild, so to speak, unaware of themselves or me.
I decided that the best way to accomplish this was to adopt the wildlife photographer’s technique of creating a concealing blind in a game-rich environment and wait and watch for my elusive quarry to emerge.
The game-rich environment, for the most part,  is Times Square although there are some Bryant Park and Washington Square habitats included.
In these congested and fast moving environments, a lone photographer, even out in plain sight, blends into the visual environment like another tourist, resident or trash bin. Invisible, or mostly so.
The actual capture was done using a long tele-photo zoom lens so that I could freeze the expressive moment of an interesting face without drawing attention to myself.

I hope you enjoy these faces, unaware of themselves, as much as I did capturing them.

Enjoy,

Bob